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Important Notice

 

Please click on Covid Vaccination tab on the right hand side of this page for more information - latest update 20th May 2021

 

We are here for you when you need us – how to access services

If you need the help of a GP, practice nurse or other health professional that works in our surgery, we are here for you.

GP practices are busier than they have ever been and we want you to know how to get the help you need from us.

As you will know, we have been open throughout the pandemic, offering you telephone and online appointments, with face to face consultations available for those who need them. We have continued to help many thousands of patients each week, alongside planning and delivering the COVID-19 vaccination programme.

There are some things that patients can do to help make sure we can see everyone who needs us, as quickly as possible. Please continue to contact us by phone or online as this helps us to manage people entering our practice building; it is much better if you don’t come to the practice unless you have an appointment. We need to keep social distancing in our practice building to keep everyone safe, we also ask that you always wear a mask while in the surgery. Please remember that appointments are a set amount of time so it is only safe to discuss one or two health issues. If you have more to discuss please mention this when you speak to reception staff.

Our busiest times of the day on the phones are between 8am and 10am so if you can, we would suggest that you call outside of this time.

During the pandemic the use of our online system “eConsult” increased. It is a great way to get clinical advice for your condition, however, it is worth remembering that each consultation takes a significant of time to review and there are lots of other ways to get advice. Also you will not get an instant response to these so if it is urgent please call the practice or contact 111.]

On our website we have links to key NHS information and advice. Please also go to www.nhs.uk which is a as a source of trusted health advice about your or your child’s condition. Your local pharmacist is also there for you as an expert in medicines. They can offer advice for certain ailments. They will also know when you need to contact a GP or another more urgent service. Many pharmacies are open in the evening and at weekends, you can find them on the CCG website: https://www.enhertsccg.nhs.uk/pharmacies

Remember if the situation is urgent you can contact NHS 111 by visiting www.111.nhs.uk or by calling 111. They can also support with a mental health crisis if you select option 2.

You don’t need to see a GP to refer yourself for some mental health services. Find out more at https://www.hpft.nhs.uk/services/community-services/wellbeing-service/ If you are worried about your mental health and any harm you may cause yourself please contact your practice.

Remember to always dial 999 straight away when it is a real emergency, for example if you think someone is having a heart attack or a stroke.

Please continue to use general practice when you need to, we are open and there for you.

Thank you for your support.

NHS Data Sharing Leaflet-Urgent

 

NHS Data Sharing

 

Better information means better care

 Using information about the care you have received enables those involved in providing care and health services to improve the quality of care and health services for all. The role of the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) is to ensure that high quality information is used appropriately to improve patient care.

 

NHS England has therefore commissioned a programme of work on behalf of the NHS, public health and social care services to address gaps in information. Our aim is to ensure that the best possible evidence is available to improve the quality of care for all.

 

It is important that the NHS can use this information to get a complete picture of what is happening across health and social care and to plan services according to what works best. The new system will provide joined-up information about the care received from all of the different parts of the health service, including hospitals and GP practices.

 

Your date of birth, full postcode, NHS Number and gender rather than your name will be used to link your records in a secure system, managed by the HSCIC. Once this information has been linked, a new record will be created. This new record will not contain information that identifies you. The type of information shared, and how it is shared, is controlled by law and strict confidentiality rules.

 

Sharing information about the care you have received helps us to understand the health needs of everyone and the quality of the treatment and care provided and reduce inequalities in the care provided. The new system will also provide information that will enable the public to hold the NHS to account and ensure that any unacceptable standards of care are identified as quickly as possible. Information will help to:

 

•find more effective ways of preventing, treating and managing illnesses

•make sure that any changes or improvements to services reflect the needs of the local patients

•understand who is most at risk of particular diseases and conditions, so those who can plan care   can provide preventative services

•improve your understanding of the outcomes of care, giving you greater confidence in health and social care services

•identify who could be at risk of a condition or would benefit from a particular treatment

•make sure that the NHS organisations receive the correct payments for the services they provide

•improve the public’s understanding of the outcomes of care, giving them confidence in health and care services

•guide decisions about how to manage NHS resources so that they can best support the treatment and management of illness for all patients 

 

It is important that you read the leaflet Better information means better care (PDF, 2MB) so that you understand how information in medical records can be used to improve the way that healthcare is delivered.

 

If you are happy for your information to be used then you do not need to do anything. But if you have concerns or if you do not want information that identifies you from being shared outside your GP practice, as described here, inform a member of staff at your practice. They will make a note of this in your medical record. This will prevent your information being used other than where necessary by law, such as in case of a public health emergency.

 

You will also be able to restrict the use of information held by other places you receive care from. However, this will not affect the care you receive.

 

You can change your mind at any time and as many times as you wish. Just inform your GP practice and ask them to record your wishes. 

 

Information from GP practices will begin to be extracted and sent to the HSCIC in the spring 2014. The GP data will be linked with the hospital data already held by the HSCIC.

 

For more information about how data is collected and shared, including confidentiality, read the Q&A below or the Patient FAQs (PDF, 52Kb) produced by the HSCIC and NHS England.

 

Call our dedicated patient information line in relation to data sharing on 0300 456 3531. Translation and text phone services are also available.

 

 



 
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