Much Hadham Health Centre

The Health Centre, Ash Meadow, Much Hadham, Herts, SG10 6DE

We're open

NHS

Telephone: 01279 842 242

much.hadham@nhs.net

Hospital Admission and Discharge

Tips for Hospital Visits or Admissions

Some links to useful information on Princess Alexandra Hospital website:

https://www.pah.nhs.uk/inpatients/

https://www.pah.nhs.uk/patients-and-visitors/

https://www.pah.nhs.uk/outpatients/

As we are all aware, staff in hospitals are under a great deal of pressure, particularly since Covid started and sometimes an appointment, or an admission may not go as smoothly as it should.  Here are a few things that we should be aware of, which will not only benefit us, but the hospital as well.

Procedures and Admissions

It is advisable to take any medication you have been prescribed with you, along with your mobile phone charger and your face mask.

When entering hospital check that each department/ward has the correct details for your next-of-kin.  You can be transferred to somewhere and the correct details do not necessarily go with you.

If you are on blood thinners, check whether you should stop these before going to hospital and how long before your visit.

Make sure each ward you are on, or department you visit, is aware of all medication you take.

If you are feeling uncomfortable or cold on a chair, trolley, or in bed, tell the staff and ask for whatever you feel you need, e.g. to lay down, a pillow, a blanket.

If you are being prepared for a procedure/operation which you were not expecting, check they have right person.  There may be another patient with a similar name.

If advised that a procedure or operation should be done within a certain time frame, bring this to their attention and push for it.

Visits to Hospital

 If you are asked to walk to see someone, or to go for an x-ray, etc. and you are not able to do so, ask for a wheelchair.

Should you be taken to hospital by ambulance and you are treated for one symptom, but know that there is something else wrong with you, make sure that they have looked at all pages of notes that may have been handed over to the hospital.

Should you be treated for a condition and told to come back to a department, or given an appointment (e.g. physio) and when you arrive back at hospital the reception tell you the department is not open – go to the department to check.  Sometimes reception do not realise they have their own facilities.

If you have been treated at hospital, but told to go to your own practice for follow up about the condition, check if all test results will be sent to the practice automatically, so that the doctor doesn’t have to arrange for these to be done again, or ask for them to be sent to the practice.

If you are told that you need x-rays, scans etc. and receive an appointment to see the consultant before these have been done, tell the consultant’s secretary as soon as you receive the appointment.

Check with the hospital that the consultant has the results of any tests you have had in connection with the appointment before attending.  It could be a wasted appointment if they don’t have them.

If you receive an appointment and you don’t know what it is for and it doesn’t say, check with the consultant’s secretary, as he/she may not know either and it will be a wasted appointment.

If being discharged and told to take some medication you don’t think you should – check

Admissions and Discharge

If you are told by a nurse or someone that you have a condition, but the doctor hasn’t said you have it, check with the doctor.  Sometimes symptoms can be misleading.

If you are being discharged and told that an occupational therapist will see you, or visit your home, to discuss your needs at home, make sure that they do and follow it up if they don’t.

If you, or someone you are looking out for, is told they will have some equipment at home following your/their discharge, ask whoever tells you this where the equipment is coming from.  This will enable you to chase if it doesn’t arrive.

If you have someone in hospital and don’t think they are being cared for properly, ask to speak to the ward manager.

If you are going to collect someone who has been discharged from hospital, check that they are not waiting for medication from the hospital pharmacy before going to collect them, as they may have been discharged, but prescriptions can take ages to come from a hospital pharmacy.

Don’t be afraid to make your voice heard, politely of course, and to wear a face mask when visiting any hospital or centre.